version numbers

introduction

On a Linux system one sometimes needs to check on the version numbers of installed software. Here are a few quick methods for doing so, followed by a sample script indicating the sorts of responses which might be obtained.

For information on your operating system, kernel version, and processor

uname -a

To interpret the output of the above command

info uname

To see your version of RedHat Linux

rpm -q redhat-release

to see your version of the linux kernel

rpm -q kernel

For information on your GNU C library version

/lib/libc.so.6

To see your version of the glibc

ls /lib/libc-*

To see a list of your environment variables and their values

set

To learn the directory containing the java executible

which java

To see a list of all the installed rpm packages and their versions

rpm -qa

To ask an application to give you its version number the flag -v is sometimes helpful.

zip -v

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Here is an edited transcript illustrating the output of some of the above commands:

$ uname -a
Linux calypso.sewanee.edu 2.2.14-5.0 #1 Tue Mar 7 21:07:39 EST 2000 i686 unknown

$ rpm -q redhat-release
redhat-release-6.2-1

$ rpm -q kernel
kernel-2.2.14-5.0

$ set
AUTOBOOT=YES
BASH=/bin/bash
BASH_ENV=/home/parrish/.bashrc
BASH_VERSION=1.14.7(1)
BOOT_IMAGE=linux
COLORTERM=
... (lots more)

$ rpm -qa
ElectricFence-2.1-3
setup-2.1.8-1
filesystem-1.3.5-1
basesystem-6.0-4
ldconfig-1.9.5-16
ImageMagick-4.2.9-3
glibc-2.1.3-159
...
redhat-release-6.2-1
... (lots more)

$ ls /lib/libc-*
/lib/libc-2.1.3.so

$ /lib/libc.so.6
GNU C Library stable release version 2.1.3, by Roland McGrath et al.
...blah blah blah



cparrish@sewanee.edu